More than one-third of Nigerians experienced moderate or high lived poverty in previous year, survey shows
By admin On 28 Mar, 2018 At 01:05 AM | Categorized As News | With 0 Comments

More than one-third of Nigerians repeatedly went without basic life necessities during the previous year, placing them in the category of “moderate lived poverty” or “high lived poverty,” a recent Afrobarometer survey indicates.

Survey findings also show that among Nigerians who tried to access certain public services, large proportions say it was difficult, took “a long time,” and required the payment of a bribe to obtain certain services.

Despite government efforts to combat corruption, citizens’ responses indicate that access to basic public service remains riddled with bribery.

Key findings

  • More than one-third of Nigerians experienced “moderate lived poverty” (27%) or “high lived poverty” (10%) during the previous year (see Figure 1), meaning they repeatedly went without basic life necessities.
  • About half of Nigerians went without enough food (51%), medical care (48%), cooking fuel (47%), or water (41%) at least once during the previous year (Figure 2). More than three-fourths (77%) went without a cash income at least once.
  • Among Nigerians who tried to obtain certain public services during the previous year:
  • Majorities say it was “difficult” or “very difficult” to obtain identity documents (65%), police assistance (64%), and household utility services (59%) (Figure 3).
  • Majorities say they had to wait “a long time” to obtain police assistance and identity documents, or else they never received them. Access to medical care was relatively faster (Figure 4).
  • More than two-thirds (68%) say they had to pay a bribe to obtain police assistance. Substantial proportions (20% to 44%) say they had to pay a bribe to obtain other services (Figure 5).

Afrobarometer

Afrobarometer is a pan-African, non-partisan research network that conducts public attitude surveys on democracy, governance, economic conditions, and related issues across more than 35 countries in Africa. Six rounds of surveys were conducted between 1999 and 2015, and Round 7 surveys (2016/2018) are currently underway. Afrobarometer conducts face-to-face interviews in the language of the respondent’s choice with nationally representative samples.

The Afrobarometer national partners in Nigeria, CLEEN Foundation and Practical Sampling International, interviewed a nationally representative, random, stratified probability sample of 1,600 adult Nigerians between 26 April and 10 May 2017. A sample of this size yields country-level results with a margin of error of +/-2% at a 95% confidence level. Previous surveys have been conducted in Nigeria in 1999, 2002, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2012, and 2014.

Charts

Figure 1: Lived poverty | Nigeria | 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Respondents were asked: Over the past year, how often, if ever, have you or anyone in your family: Gone without enough food to eat? Gone without enough clean water for home use? Gone without medicines or medical treatment? Gone without enough fuel to cook your food? Gone without a cash income?

Figure 2: Deprivation of basic necessities | Nigeria | 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Respondents were asked: Over the past year, how often, if ever, have you or anyone in your family: Gone without enough food to eat? Gone without enough clean water for home use? Gone without medicines or medical treatment? Gone without enough fuel to cook your food? Gone without a cash income?

Figure 3: Difficulty accessing public services | Nigeria | 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Respondents were asked: In the past 12 months, have you: Had contact with a public school? Had contact with a public clinic or hospital? Tried to get an identity document like a birth certificate, driver’s license, passport or voter’s card, or permit from government? Tried to get water, sanitation, or electric services from government? Requested assistance from police? [If yes:] How easy or difficult was it to obtain the service?

 

Figure 4: Time taken to access public services | Nigeria | 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Respondents were asked: In the past 12 months, have you: Had contact with a public school? Had contact with a clinic or hospital? Tried to get an identity document like a birth certificate, driver’s license, passport or voter’s card, or permit from government? Tried to get water, sanitation, or electric services from government? Requested assistance from police? [If yes:] How long did it take you to obtain the service?

 

Figure 5: Paid bribe to access services | Nigeria | 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Respondents who said they had contact with selected public services during the previous year were asked: And how often, if ever, did you have to pay a bribe, give a gift, or do a favour: For a teacher or school official in order to get the services you needed from the schools? For a health worker or clinic or hospital staff in order to get the medical care you needed? For a government official in order to get the document you needed? For a government official in order to get the services you needed? For a police officer in order to get the assistance you needed? For a police officer in order to avoid a problem during one of these encounters?

(% who say “once or twice,” “a few times,” or “often”)

About -

Leave a comment

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>


21